Bridging the Digital Divide

Confronting the global coronavirus pandemic by closing schools, businesses, and public spaces has disrupted family life and knocked our community on its heels. The disruption has magnified inequity in Oakland, and families with the fewest resources are being disproportionately impacted. If ever there was a time for a community to rally in service to one another and to those with the greatest need, this is it.

In my day job at EducationSuperHighway, we have launched an initiative to leverage our relationships with governors and state education leaders, with the FCC, and with internet service providers to bridge the digital divide, especially as it impacts students at home. Our DigitalBridge K-12 program team is gathering resources and collaborating with school districts to develop a playbook for connecting the families that are currently being denied access to an education because they cannot connect online. (One of my tasks was to build a search tool so that families can enter a zip code to find the available programs that are being offered during the pandemic.)

For students in Oakland to thrive, learn, and grow they need to engage with one another and their teachers even as they are sheltering at home. This requires a combination of hardware, software, and a robust network. To deliver those resources to those who currently lack them is going to require quick, thoughtful, and decisive action. Later this week I am joining with other Oakland leaders in the education community to draft policies that will encourage the Board of Education to take meaningful steps to bridge Oakland’s digital divide. The task before us will extend beyond the short term need to connect students for the balance of this school year. This digital divide has been a persistent issue for disconnected families, even when school is in session. Students without broadband at home don’t have access to the resources that help them keep pace with their privileged peers, so policies set by the board should take into account the need to make internet access persistent and accessible for families even as we return to school and work after this crisis passes. (And the emerging common view is that even when students and teachers return to school there will continue to be impact from this pandemic for many months until a vaccine is broadly available.)

This work is only one piece of the inequity puzzle and as we confront this crisis, there are many organizations that are responding with urgency. Access to food, to shelter, and to safety are even more urgent — and the pandemic has brought into stark relief the deep and abiding inequity that is and has been pervasive in Oakland for decades, and these inequities cry out to be addressed by our service to one another. Organizations like The Oakland Reach are leading in this kind of service. This is a time for our community to heed the words of Mahtma Gandhi and confront this pandemic by joyfully taking up the opportunity to serve.

Service which is rendered without joy helps neither the servant nor the served. But all other pleasures and possessions pale into nothingness before service which is rendered in a spirit of joy.

Mahatma Gandhi